A Tucson Arizona Bed and Breakfast

(520) 722-6879

Check Availability

Archive for March, 2016

Tucson Street Fair

March 31st, 2016 by Betty Ross

 

streetfairfair

There are two Street Fairs per year, one in Spring and one in the Winter. The next Street Fair is April 1, 2 and 3, 2016. Hours are 10 am to 6pm (dusk) each day. The Street Fair takes place between Ninth Street and University Blvd. along Fourth Avenue. Click here for a map.Free to the public, the Fourth Avenue Street Fair brings together 400+ arts and crafts booths, 35+ food vendors, 2 Fantastic Stages, street musicians, food, jugglers, street performers, face painting, sidewalk entertainment, the ever so popular Free Kids hands-on-art Pavilion and tons of other fun activities.

This year, we are making it better than ever before with new ways to experience the Street Fair. Get your grub on with U.S. Fries at the U.S. Fries Community stage for their Poutine Pig Out Contest. You can also support your community by donating nonperishable food items to benefit the Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona. Bring your food to VIP Taxi who will have a cab parked at 7th St. and 4th Avenue for “Stuff the Cab” every day of the fair. Get around in inexpensive comfort, with our new and exciting mode of transportation! Wildcarts is the new, free “Official People Mover of 4th.” Try them out at Street Fair and hail one down for any of 4th’s future events.

Dinning

A stay at Desert Dove would be a great choice for a place to stay.

The desert is blooming with yellow!

Wildflowers

Saint Patrick’s Day

March 11th, 2016 by Betty Ross

saintpatrickThe wearing of the green is nearly upon us, and so the season of green beer, bagels and milkshakes has begun. While there’s nothing particularly Irish about shamrock-shaped cookies or green-frosted cupcakes, you might be surprised to learn that the traditional St. Paddy’s meal—corned beef and cabbage—is no more authentic. Like many aspects of St. Patrick’s Day, the dish came about when Irish-Americans transformed and reinterpreted a tradition imported from the Emerald Isle.

The first St. Patrick’s Day parade took place not in Dublin but in New York City, in 1762. Over the next 100 years, Irish immigration to the United States exploded. The new wave of immigrants brought their own food traditions, including soda bread and Irish stew. Pork was the preferred meat, since it was cheap in Ireland and ubiquitous on the dinner table. The favored cut was Irish bacon, a lean, smoked pork loin similar to Canadian bacon. But in the United States, pork was prohibitively expensive for most newly arrived Irish families, so they began cooking beef—the staple meat in the American diet—instead.

So how did pork and potatoes become corned beef and cabbage? Irish immigrants to America lived alongside other “undesirable” European ethnic groups that often faced discrimination in their new home, including Jews and Italians. Members of the Irish working class in New York City frequented Jewish delis and lunch carts, and it was there that they first tasted corned beef. Cured and cooked much like Irish bacon, it was seen as a tasty and cheaper alternative to pork. And while potatoes were certainly available in the United States, cabbage offered a more cost-effective alternative to cash-strapped Irish families. Cooked in the same pot, the spiced, salty beef flavored the plain cabbage, creating a simple, hearty dish that couldn’t be easier to prepare.

After taking off among New York City’s Irish community, corned beef and cabbage found fans across the country. It was the perfect dish for everyone from harried housewives to busy cooks on trains and in cafeterias—cheap, easy to cook and hard to overcook. It was even served alongside mock turtle coup at President Lincoln’s inauguration dinner in 1862.

Far from being as Irish as a shamrock field, this St. Patrick’s Day classic is as American as apple pie.

Desert Dove will be serving something green for breakfast! Our popular Spinach Egg Nests, and some yummy Irish Soda Bread!

Festival of Books

March 11th, 2016 by Betty Ross

A fun and enjoyable event in Tucson this weekend. Enjoy a stay at Desert Dove Bed & Breakfast   to round out a great weekend!

booksThe annual Tucson Festival of Books will be held Saturday and Sunday from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on the campus of the University of Arizona. The festival features more than 350 authors and panelists, 250 exhibitors, and opportunities to meet famous authors, poets, writers and journalists. There will be book signings, panel discussions, live entertainment, food vendors, children’s activities, Science City, and dozens of free activities for all ages. Admission is free and both Sun Link and Sun Tran provide stops within a short walk of the festival. Sun Link will be kicking off the Festival of Books with an onboard reading by award winning children’s author, Conrad Storad, on Saturday, March 12 at 10 a.m. Storad will begin his reading at the Avenida del Convento stop (across from Mercado San Agustin) and will exit at the University of Arizona to participate in the Festival of Books at the Children’s Storyteller

festival of books

 

Arizona State Museum

March 5th, 2016 by Betty Ross

museumArizona State Museum | The University of Arizona
1013 E University Blvd | PO Box 210026
Tucson, AZ 85721-0026
(520) 626-8381 | 621-2976 FAX
AZ State Museum

Gallery

March 5th, 2016 by Betty Ross

Just one of the Art Gallery’s to visit during your stay at Desert Dove  in Tucson AZ

degrazia

DeGrazia Gallery in the Sun
6300 N Swan
Tucson, AZ 85718
Phone: (520) 299-9191
Toll Free: (800) 545-2185
(1909-1982)
The son of Italian immigrants, Ettore DeGrazia was born June 14, 1909, in the Morenci mining camp of Territorial Arizona. His early childhood experiences in the ethnically diverse community evolved into a lifelong appreciation of native cultures in the Sonoran Desert and a passion to create art depicting their lives and lore.
After the Phelps Dodge mine closed in 1920, DeGrazia was introduced to his parent’s hometown when they moved their seven children to the Calabria region of Italy. The family returned to Morenci when the mine reopened five years later. Enrolling again in the first grade to relearn English, DeGrazia–nicknamed Ted by a schoolteacher–graduated from Morenci High School when he was 23 years old. By then he was an accomplished trumpeter who performed with family and friends.
After working briefly in the mine, DeGrazia hitched a ride to Tucson with his trumpet and $15 in his pocket. He enrolled at the University of Arizona in 1933, where he supported himself planting trees on campus by day and leading his big band at night. During one performance he met Alexandra, the daughter of Fox Theater owner Nicholas Diamos. Ted and Alexandra wed in 1936 and moved to Bisbee so DeGrazia could manage the Lyric Theater there, also owned by the Diamos family. The couple had three children during this time but divorced in 1946.
DeGrazia and Diego Rivera
DeGrazia and Diego Rivera
DeGrazia continued creating his early paintings in Bisbee and by 1941, Raymond Carlson, editor of Arizona Highways, started publishing features about the artist. On a rare vacation to Mexico City in 1942, DeGrazia and Alexandra left an evening ballet performance and headed to the Palacio Municipal where muralist Diego Rivera was working. This encounter led to an internship with Rivera and Jose Clemente Orozco. The two Mexican masters then sponsored a solo exhibition of DeGrazia’s paintings at the prestigious Palacio de Bellas Artes.
“Los Niños”
“Los Niños”
After returning to Tucson, DeGrazia found that no gallery was interested in exhibiting his artwork, so he bought an acre of land with $25 down at Prince Road and Campbell Avenue to build his first adobe studio in 1944, and also received a BA in Education from the University of Arizona. The following year he received a BFA, plus a Master of Arts titled “Art and Its Relation to Music in Art Education”.
New York sculptor Marion Sheret met the artist when visiting his Campbell Avenue studio. As she recalled, his first words to her were “Where have you been?” They married in the jungles of Mexico in 1947 and bought the 10-acre foothills site in the early 1950s to build what was to become DeGrazia’s Gallery in the Sun.
DeGrazia’s paintings, ceramics and other artwork steadily attracted media attention including the NBC newsreel “Watch the World” and a profile in the 1953 National Geographic article “From Tucson to Tombstone.” His fame flourished when UNICEF chose his 1957 oil painting “Los Niños” for a 1960 holiday card that sold millions worldwide.
Protest at the Superstition Mountains
Protest at the Superstition Mountains
From 1960 to the mid-1970s DeGrazia became wildly successful and the gallery flourished with hundreds of thousands of yearly visitors. To protest inheritance taxes on works of art, DeGrazia hauled about 100 of his paintings on horseback into the Superstition Mountains near Phoenix and set them ablaze in 1976. This infamous event was reported in such publications as The Wall Street Journal and People magazine, becoming part of DeGrazia’s legend before his death in 1982. By this time, the artist had established the DeGrazia Foundation to ensure the permanent preservation of his art and architecture for future generations.

Wild Flowers and Birds

March 1st, 2016 by Betty Ross

verdinMelody’s Birding Adventure 

So Many Birds, So Little Time

We have great birding here at Desert Dove Bed & Breakfast.  Click on Desert Dove to see just a few of our birds. All the pictures were taken on our property.

If you wish a personal birding guide, Melody is the one to call. Take a look at her website. You can call Melody or send her an email to set up the day and time. She will pick you up here at Desert Dove and experience a wonderful birding adventure!

hummingbird_4796016_smnewflowers3

Arizona Archaeology

March 1st, 2016 by Betty Ross

Saturday, March 12, 2016    11:00 a.m. – 3: 00 p.m., Free

Come get to know your State Museum! In celebration of Arizona Archaeology and Heritage Awareness Month, you’ll have the opportunity to meet curators, visit laboratories, and tour collections areas in the largest and busiest state-run archaeological repository in the nation.

2e0e7ecc-ac2d-4443-acd8-5bc9d85ec179

»