A Tucson Arizona Bed and Breakfast

(520) 722-6879

Check Availability

Archive for the ‘Tucson Arizona Attractions’ Category

Wildflowers

April 3rd, 2016 by Betty Ross

poppy
Picacho Peak State Park

About 40 miles northwest of Tucson along Interstate 10. Take Exit 219 for the Picacho Peak Road.

Park day use hours are 5 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Admission: $7 per vehicle

Related Links

Wildflowers are on a blooming binge this week at Picacho Peak State Park northwest of Tucson.

Carpets of dazzling gold poppies play a starring role in the colorful show — but other wildflowers add their own hues to the landscape. Among them: blue lupines, orange globemallow, white desert chicory and bright yellow brittlebush.

“Beautiful!” “Awesome!” “Amazing!”

Trek one of the park’s flower-flanked trails this month, and you’re likely to hear such exclamations again and again from hikers along the way.

“It’s a rare occurrence to see this wonderful poppy bloom at Picacho Peak State Park,” said Sue Black, director of Arizona State Parks.

Aaron Soggs, manager of the park, said, “At Picacho, the rain data is showing just about 12 inches, which is the accumulated total since September of 2014. The last great year of flowers was 1998, when there was 12 inches of rain, and we are seeing the same result now with the abundance of Mexican poppies blooming.

You’ll find some expanses of poppies and other blooms in the desert area encircled by the loop drive. Try lower reaches of the Hunter Trail and the Calloway Trail for additional good wildflower displays.

Festival of Books

March 11th, 2016 by Betty Ross

A fun and enjoyable event in Tucson this weekend. Enjoy a stay at Desert Dove Bed & Breakfast   to round out a great weekend!

booksThe annual Tucson Festival of Books will be held Saturday and Sunday from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on the campus of the University of Arizona. The festival features more than 350 authors and panelists, 250 exhibitors, and opportunities to meet famous authors, poets, writers and journalists. There will be book signings, panel discussions, live entertainment, food vendors, children’s activities, Science City, and dozens of free activities for all ages. Admission is free and both Sun Link and Sun Tran provide stops within a short walk of the festival. Sun Link will be kicking off the Festival of Books with an onboard reading by award winning children’s author, Conrad Storad, on Saturday, March 12 at 10 a.m. Storad will begin his reading at the Avenida del Convento stop (across from Mercado San Agustin) and will exit at the University of Arizona to participate in the Festival of Books at the Children’s Storyteller

festival of books

 

Gallery

March 5th, 2016 by Betty Ross

Just one of the Art Gallery’s to visit during your stay at Desert Dove  in Tucson AZ

degrazia

DeGrazia Gallery in the Sun
6300 N Swan
Tucson, AZ 85718
Phone: (520) 299-9191
Toll Free: (800) 545-2185
(1909-1982)
The son of Italian immigrants, Ettore DeGrazia was born June 14, 1909, in the Morenci mining camp of Territorial Arizona. His early childhood experiences in the ethnically diverse community evolved into a lifelong appreciation of native cultures in the Sonoran Desert and a passion to create art depicting their lives and lore.
After the Phelps Dodge mine closed in 1920, DeGrazia was introduced to his parent’s hometown when they moved their seven children to the Calabria region of Italy. The family returned to Morenci when the mine reopened five years later. Enrolling again in the first grade to relearn English, DeGrazia–nicknamed Ted by a schoolteacher–graduated from Morenci High School when he was 23 years old. By then he was an accomplished trumpeter who performed with family and friends.
After working briefly in the mine, DeGrazia hitched a ride to Tucson with his trumpet and $15 in his pocket. He enrolled at the University of Arizona in 1933, where he supported himself planting trees on campus by day and leading his big band at night. During one performance he met Alexandra, the daughter of Fox Theater owner Nicholas Diamos. Ted and Alexandra wed in 1936 and moved to Bisbee so DeGrazia could manage the Lyric Theater there, also owned by the Diamos family. The couple had three children during this time but divorced in 1946.
DeGrazia and Diego Rivera
DeGrazia and Diego Rivera
DeGrazia continued creating his early paintings in Bisbee and by 1941, Raymond Carlson, editor of Arizona Highways, started publishing features about the artist. On a rare vacation to Mexico City in 1942, DeGrazia and Alexandra left an evening ballet performance and headed to the Palacio Municipal where muralist Diego Rivera was working. This encounter led to an internship with Rivera and Jose Clemente Orozco. The two Mexican masters then sponsored a solo exhibition of DeGrazia’s paintings at the prestigious Palacio de Bellas Artes.
“Los Niños”
“Los Niños”
After returning to Tucson, DeGrazia found that no gallery was interested in exhibiting his artwork, so he bought an acre of land with $25 down at Prince Road and Campbell Avenue to build his first adobe studio in 1944, and also received a BA in Education from the University of Arizona. The following year he received a BFA, plus a Master of Arts titled “Art and Its Relation to Music in Art Education”.
New York sculptor Marion Sheret met the artist when visiting his Campbell Avenue studio. As she recalled, his first words to her were “Where have you been?” They married in the jungles of Mexico in 1947 and bought the 10-acre foothills site in the early 1950s to build what was to become DeGrazia’s Gallery in the Sun.
DeGrazia’s paintings, ceramics and other artwork steadily attracted media attention including the NBC newsreel “Watch the World” and a profile in the 1953 National Geographic article “From Tucson to Tombstone.” His fame flourished when UNICEF chose his 1957 oil painting “Los Niños” for a 1960 holiday card that sold millions worldwide.
Protest at the Superstition Mountains
Protest at the Superstition Mountains
From 1960 to the mid-1970s DeGrazia became wildly successful and the gallery flourished with hundreds of thousands of yearly visitors. To protest inheritance taxes on works of art, DeGrazia hauled about 100 of his paintings on horseback into the Superstition Mountains near Phoenix and set them ablaze in 1976. This infamous event was reported in such publications as The Wall Street Journal and People magazine, becoming part of DeGrazia’s legend before his death in 1982. By this time, the artist had established the DeGrazia Foundation to ensure the permanent preservation of his art and architecture for future generations.

Tucson Rodeo and Parade

February 18th, 2015 by Betty Ross

 Tucson Rodeo

rodeo

2015 Schedule of Events
90th ANNUAL LA FIESTA DE LOS VAQUEROS

All events are at the Tucson Rodeo Grounds, 4823 S. 6th Ave., unless otherwise noted.

(520) 741-2233 (800) 964-5662

See ticket choices and prices»
SATURDAY, FEB. 21

TUCSON RODEO OPENING DAY

Orange Day – Hunger Awareness Event by Whataburger at the Tucson Rodeo
See details below

Canon Photo Workshop – reservations required – $85 per person
11 a.m. – gates open
12:30 p.m. RAM Mutton Bustin’ and Justin Junior Rodeo
2 – 4:30 p.m. ProRodeo Competition
4:30 – 8 p.m. Coors Barn Dance

For more information on rodeo events, see Events.
SUNDAY, FEB. 22

TUCSON RODEO – SECOND PERFORMANCE

Pink Day – Cowboys & fans wear pink to support breast cancer intiatives. Chicks n Chaps breast cancer research fundraising event returns. Sponsored by Arizona Oncology. Visit our Chicks n

Chaps page now» 8 a.m. Chicks n Chaps Women’s Rodeo Clinichorse2
11 a.m. – gates open
12:30 p.m. RAM Mutton Bustin’ and Justin Junior Rodeo
2 – 4:30 p.m. ProRodeo Competition
4:30 – 8 p.m. Coors Barn Dance

Note: Full rodeo performances resume on Thursday, Feb. 26.
MONDAY AND TUESDAY, FEB. 23 AND 24

TIMED EVENTS COMPETITION (SLACK), 8 A.M.

Barrel Racing, Steer Wrestling, Tie-Down and Team Roping only. Admission: $5 general admission, children 12 and under free. Available at the gate only. Free parking.

 

Reach program for school children – 9:30 a.m. – Noonhorse3jpeg
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 25
Barrel Racing slack, 8 – 9 a.m.; Gold Card Roping at 10 a.m.

PARADE FLOAT DECORATING, 4 P.M.

Northwest area of Tucson Rodeo Grounds parking lot
THURSDAY, FEB. 26

TUCSON RODEO PARADE 9 A.M.
Over 200 non-motorized floats are on display along the one and one-half mile parade route beginning at Park Ave. and Ajo Way, proceeding south on Park to Irvington Rd. Tickets for Grandstand seating at Irvington and South 6th Ave, $10 adults, $5 kids under 13. Call (520) 294-1280 for grandstand tickets.

TUCSON RODEO, THIRD PERFORMANCE
11 a.m. – gates open
12:30 p.m. RAM Mutton Bustin’ and Justin Junior Rodeo
2 – 4:30 p.m. ProRodeo Competition
4:30 – 8 p.m. Coors Barn Dance ($5 online or at the door)rodeo1

FRIDAY, FEB. 27

TUCSON RODEO, FOURTH PERFORMANCE
11 a.m. – gates open
12:30 p.m. RAM Mutton Bustin’ and Justin Junior Rodeo
2 – 4:30 p.m. ProRodeo Competition
4:30 – 8 p.m. Coors Barn Dance ($5 online or at the door)

SATURDAY, FEB. 28

TUCSON RODEO, FIFTH PERFORMANCE
11 a.m. – gates open
12:30 p.m. RAM Mutton Bustin’ and Justin Junior Rodeo
2 – 4:30 p.m. ProRodeo Competition
4:30 – 8 p.m. Coors Barn Dance ($5 online or at the door)

SUNDAY, MARCH 1

TUCSON RODEO FINALS
11 a.m. – gates open
12:30 p.m. RAM Mutton Bustin’ and Justin Junior Rodeo
2 – 4:30 p.m. ProRodeo Competition
4:30 – 8 p.m. Coors Barn Dance ($5 online or at the door)

64396_474049272643758_627620844_nA colorful parade presented annually as part of the Tucson Rodeo and Parade (La Fiesta de los Vaqueros) since 1925. Now known as the “largest non-motorized parade in the country,” it was selected as a Top 100 Event in North America for 2015 by the American Bus Association. Longtime Tucsonan and former University of Arizona baseball coach Jerry Kindall has been chosen Grand Marshal of the 2015 Tucson Rodeo Parade.

February 26, 2015

 

Tucson Gem and Mineral Show 2015

January 19th, 2015 by Betty Ross

Gem Show    

images-1images

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Tucson Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase is one of the premier gem and mineral shows in the world. The event takes place annually in late January and February at approximately 40 to 49 different locations across the city of Tucson, Arizona. Most of the shows are open to the public, except for certain trade shows which require registration with a business license. There is not one single location for gems, minerals and fossils, but rather dealers occupy dozens of locations across the city: many big hotels and most motels are occupied for this occasion, with professionals displaying their specimens in such locations as hotel bedrooms, lobbies, tents, and lawns. The premier event of the Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase is the Tucson Gem & Mineral Show produced by the Tucson Gem and Mineral Society. This show has been held annually since 1955 and now occupies 181,000 square feet (16,800 m2) of the Tucson Convention Center. All of the shows have attendees from all across the world which includes the general public, experts, beginning collectors, museum employees, dealers, retailers, and researchers.

Fun times in Tucson!  Enjoy great weather with sunny days, and great food!

A stay at the Desert Dove Bed & Breakfast would be a good choice after a full day of shopping. Relaxing in the spa under the stars, what could be better!

 

Tucson Gem Show

January 29th, 2014 by Betty Ross

gems The World’s Largest Treasure Hunt
February 1 – 16, 2014
The popular Gem Show Hotline, 622-GEMS(4367), will REOPEN on January 17, 2014!  In the meantime, please call our Visitor Information number at 800-638-8350. TucsonGems.

For two weeks every winter, the world meets in Tucson as it becomes a bustling, international marketplace of buyers and sellers at the Tucson Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase.

The “Gem Show” is much more than a single event at one location. Rather, there are thousands of participants and attendees at more than 40 sites around town. Dozens of shows take place at the same time – in giant white tents, at hotels and resorts and at exhibit halls.

There’s something for everyone at the many open-to-the-public shows – from gold and diamonds to granite bookends and glass beads, and from fine specimens of dinosaur fossils to opals dug from the Australian Outback.

The Desert Dove Bed and Breakfast   a great place to stay while taking in the Gem and Mineral Show. You can start your day with a cup early morning cup of coffee or your favorite tea watching the birds. Enjoy a wonderful breakfast. At the end of your long day of shopping you can relax in our hydrotherapy spa with a glass of wine and take in some stargazing!

cropped-spapatio-04622.jpg

Saguaro National Parks

April 16th, 2013 by Betty Ross

imagesSaguaro National Park

A Celebration of National Park Week and Junior Ranger Day

Ever wonder what magical and mysterious happenings occur in the desert at night? Come explore the park after dark with your family, guided by Park Rangers, and experience the sights, sounds, and smells of the desert night by moonlight.

Starting before sunset, meet at our Education Center in Saguaro National Park’s Tucson Mountain (West) District for a welcome and introduction. Here you’ll learn the fun that lies ahead and how to enjoy the exploration safely. Safety concerns will be addressed, water bottles will be filled, and off you go. The leisurely exploration will cover no more than a mile, round trip, and will be paced for everyone’s comfort. You’ll explore a sandy wash with unique red-rock outcroppings, find a cool place for sunset, listen for the magical call of the Elf owl, and walk in the paw prints of bobcats and coyotes. As darkness falls around you, rangers will share stories about nocturnal park life and answer all those curious questions about the park after dark. Walking back out, we’ll be guided by the light of the waxing half-moon. Headlamps are available for comfort and safety if needed.

·Saturday, April 20th from 5:30 PM – 9:30 PM. Sunset is about 6:56 p.m. and full dark is about 7:45 p.m. There will be an almost ¾ waxing moon high in the sky after dark.

·The program is for families with children who are 7 to 18 years old. The terrain and conditions are not appropriate for younger children.

·The program is free, space is limited, and advanced reservations are required

·For detailed information, questions, or to sign up, please email chip_littlefield@nps.gov or, call at 520.733.5157

Night Walk at Saguaro National Park east

This easy, 2-hour walk provides opportunities for experiencing the desert at night. Dress for the weather, wear comfortable walking shoes and bring water and a flashlight. Space is limited, so call the visitor center at (520) 733-5153 to reserve your spot.

Diamonds ~~~~ A Girls Best Friends

January 25th, 2013 by Betty Ross

The Desert Dove Bed and Breakfast   would be a great place to stay while taking in the Gem and Mineral Show. You can start your day with a cup of fresh ground coffee or your favorite tea and enjoy a wonderful breakfast. At the end of your long day of shopping you can relax in our hydrotherapy spa with a glass of wine and take in some stargazing!

diamons

 

Tucson Gem and Mineral Show  2013

Show Guide

For complete information on all the shows, check the 2013 Tucson Show Guide — Your Ultimate Guide to All the Tucson Gem, Mineral, Fossil, Jewelry, and Bead Shows! With 300+ pages of must-have show info, including dates, maps, and exhibitor lists, the Tucson Show Guide provides all you need to know in one easy-to-navigate guide.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arizona Sonora Desert Museum

February 17th, 2012 by Betty Ross

Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum celebrates 60 years and new exhibits.

Desert Museum News

In the Sonoran Desert, February is the month when many raptor species begin the courtship and territorial displays that precede nest–building. On warm days, the hawks in the Raptor Free Flight program use the rising air currents to soar hundreds of feet above the desert floor, announcing their presence other avian predators in the vicinity. Catch the raptor Free Flight at 10:00 and 2:00 daily, now through April 15th!

Many of our guests at  Desert Dove Bed and Breakfast in Tucson visit the Desert Museum. It is truly a wonderful place to spend time enjoying the outdoors and getting to know the desert and it’s wildlife, flora and fauna. The Desert Museum is one of the most beautiful places in Tucson. Stay the day and see the beautiful sunset …. the ‘Purple Mountain’s Majesty’ …..  gloriously majestic!

 

Pima Air & Space Museum

January 7th, 2012 by Betty Ross

January 4, 2012
Boneyard Airplanes Become Art In Tucson    
By Mary Grady, Contributing editor

Six retired military airplanes have been transformed into “monumental works of art” for the Pima Air & Space Museum in Tucson, Ariz., the museum announced this week. The “Round Trip” exhibit, set to open on Jan. 28, will feature former Air Force aircraft that had been stored for years in desert “boneyards.” Aircraft used as canvases include four DC-3s, a Beechcraft C-45 (a military version of the Beech 18), and a Lockheed VC-140 Jetstar (a 1960s-era jet used for military transport). The cockpit from a Boeing C-97 also was used as a canvas for the show. More than 30 artists from around the world took part in the project.

The show is part of an ongoing Boneyard Project, which launched last summer in New York with the “Nose Job” show, which gave the nose cones from about two dozen military aircraft to artists to use as “canvases.” The Arizona exhibit will include some selections from that show along with more than a dozen new projects that have not been previously exhibited. The Pima museum maintains a collection of more than 300 aircraft and spacecraft from around the globe and houses more than 125,000 artifacts. The Round Trip show is open to the public from Jan. 28 through the end of May.

Only a short drive to the Air & Space Museum from the Desert Dove Bed & Breakfast in Tucson, AZ

»