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Saint Patrick’s Day

March 11th, 2016 by Betty Ross

saintpatrickThe wearing of the green is nearly upon us, and so the season of green beer, bagels and milkshakes has begun. While there’s nothing particularly Irish about shamrock-shaped cookies or green-frosted cupcakes, you might be surprised to learn that the traditional St. Paddy’s meal—corned beef and cabbage—is no more authentic. Like many aspects of St. Patrick’s Day, the dish came about when Irish-Americans transformed and reinterpreted a tradition imported from the Emerald Isle.

The first St. Patrick’s Day parade took place not in Dublin but in New York City, in 1762. Over the next 100 years, Irish immigration to the United States exploded. The new wave of immigrants brought their own food traditions, including soda bread and Irish stew. Pork was the preferred meat, since it was cheap in Ireland and ubiquitous on the dinner table. The favored cut was Irish bacon, a lean, smoked pork loin similar to Canadian bacon. But in the United States, pork was prohibitively expensive for most newly arrived Irish families, so they began cooking beef—the staple meat in the American diet—instead.

So how did pork and potatoes become corned beef and cabbage? Irish immigrants to America lived alongside other “undesirable” European ethnic groups that often faced discrimination in their new home, including Jews and Italians. Members of the Irish working class in New York City frequented Jewish delis and lunch carts, and it was there that they first tasted corned beef. Cured and cooked much like Irish bacon, it was seen as a tasty and cheaper alternative to pork. And while potatoes were certainly available in the United States, cabbage offered a more cost-effective alternative to cash-strapped Irish families. Cooked in the same pot, the spiced, salty beef flavored the plain cabbage, creating a simple, hearty dish that couldn’t be easier to prepare.

After taking off among New York City’s Irish community, corned beef and cabbage found fans across the country. It was the perfect dish for everyone from harried housewives to busy cooks on trains and in cafeterias—cheap, easy to cook and hard to overcook. It was even served alongside mock turtle coup at President Lincoln’s inauguration dinner in 1862.

Far from being as Irish as a shamrock field, this St. Patrick’s Day classic is as American as apple pie.

Desert Dove will be serving something green for breakfast! Our popular Spinach Egg Nests, and some yummy Irish Soda Bread!

Gallery

March 5th, 2016 by Betty Ross

Just one of the Art Gallery’s to visit during your stay at Desert Dove  in Tucson AZ

degrazia

DeGrazia Gallery in the Sun
6300 N Swan
Tucson, AZ 85718
Phone: (520) 299-9191
Toll Free: (800) 545-2185
(1909-1982)
The son of Italian immigrants, Ettore DeGrazia was born June 14, 1909, in the Morenci mining camp of Territorial Arizona. His early childhood experiences in the ethnically diverse community evolved into a lifelong appreciation of native cultures in the Sonoran Desert and a passion to create art depicting their lives and lore.
After the Phelps Dodge mine closed in 1920, DeGrazia was introduced to his parent’s hometown when they moved their seven children to the Calabria region of Italy. The family returned to Morenci when the mine reopened five years later. Enrolling again in the first grade to relearn English, DeGrazia–nicknamed Ted by a schoolteacher–graduated from Morenci High School when he was 23 years old. By then he was an accomplished trumpeter who performed with family and friends.
After working briefly in the mine, DeGrazia hitched a ride to Tucson with his trumpet and $15 in his pocket. He enrolled at the University of Arizona in 1933, where he supported himself planting trees on campus by day and leading his big band at night. During one performance he met Alexandra, the daughter of Fox Theater owner Nicholas Diamos. Ted and Alexandra wed in 1936 and moved to Bisbee so DeGrazia could manage the Lyric Theater there, also owned by the Diamos family. The couple had three children during this time but divorced in 1946.
DeGrazia and Diego Rivera
DeGrazia and Diego Rivera
DeGrazia continued creating his early paintings in Bisbee and by 1941, Raymond Carlson, editor of Arizona Highways, started publishing features about the artist. On a rare vacation to Mexico City in 1942, DeGrazia and Alexandra left an evening ballet performance and headed to the Palacio Municipal where muralist Diego Rivera was working. This encounter led to an internship with Rivera and Jose Clemente Orozco. The two Mexican masters then sponsored a solo exhibition of DeGrazia’s paintings at the prestigious Palacio de Bellas Artes.
“Los Niños”
“Los Niños”
After returning to Tucson, DeGrazia found that no gallery was interested in exhibiting his artwork, so he bought an acre of land with $25 down at Prince Road and Campbell Avenue to build his first adobe studio in 1944, and also received a BA in Education from the University of Arizona. The following year he received a BFA, plus a Master of Arts titled “Art and Its Relation to Music in Art Education”.
New York sculptor Marion Sheret met the artist when visiting his Campbell Avenue studio. As she recalled, his first words to her were “Where have you been?” They married in the jungles of Mexico in 1947 and bought the 10-acre foothills site in the early 1950s to build what was to become DeGrazia’s Gallery in the Sun.
DeGrazia’s paintings, ceramics and other artwork steadily attracted media attention including the NBC newsreel “Watch the World” and a profile in the 1953 National Geographic article “From Tucson to Tombstone.” His fame flourished when UNICEF chose his 1957 oil painting “Los Niños” for a 1960 holiday card that sold millions worldwide.
Protest at the Superstition Mountains
Protest at the Superstition Mountains
From 1960 to the mid-1970s DeGrazia became wildly successful and the gallery flourished with hundreds of thousands of yearly visitors. To protest inheritance taxes on works of art, DeGrazia hauled about 100 of his paintings on horseback into the Superstition Mountains near Phoenix and set them ablaze in 1976. This infamous event was reported in such publications as The Wall Street Journal and People magazine, becoming part of DeGrazia’s legend before his death in 1982. By this time, the artist had established the DeGrazia Foundation to ensure the permanent preservation of his art and architecture for future generations.

Dillinger Days

January 20th, 2016 by Betty Ross

A fun weekend in Tucson January 23, 2016

Harvey will have his 1929 Model A Ford at the show.

inn5Hotel Congress would have continued its charming existence as just another place of lodging for road weary guests, were it not for the events of January 22, 1934. That fateful day changed forever the building and its unique place in Tucson history. Early in the morning, a fire started in the basement of the hotel and spread up the elevator to the third floor. This fire, and the subsequent chain of events, led to the capture of one of the country’s most notorious criminals – John Dillinger.

After a series of bank robberies, Dillinger and his gang came to Tucson to “lay low”, residing on the third floor under aliases. Using the switchboard, the front desk clerk notified hotel guests of the fire and guests were evacuated using aerial ladders. On the urgent request of the gang, and encouraged by a generous tip, two firemen retrieved the heavy luggage they left behind. It was later discovered that the bags contained a small arsenal and $23,816 in cash.

Later, these astute firemen recognized the gang in True Detective Magazine. A stakeout resulted in the capture of Dillinger at a house on North Second Avenue. In a space of five hours, without firing a single shot, the police of small town Tucson had done what the combined forces of several states and the FBI had failed to accomplish. When captured, Dillinger simply muttered, “Well, I’ll be damned”.

We still celebrate his capture each third weekend in January with Dillinger Days, which is a fun event featuring reenactments, food and music, tours and lectures.

Hotel Congress

Gathering places at Desert Dove

April 22nd, 2015 by Betty Ross

 Enjoy the sights and sounds of the desert at Desert Dove Bed & Breakfast.

Singing birds all day long!                

Desert flowers and cacti all around the 4 acres!  Lovely mountain views

Plenty of good seating for relaxation, birding, reading or conversation with other guests.

                                 Garden GateCacti 1Cacti 1Watto

seatingBack

 

backyard swingtable

frontswing seatingfront

 

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Tombstone

February 24th, 2015 by Betty Ross

 

oldtucson

Tombstone

Just an hours drive from Desert Dove Bed & Breakfast and you will be in the town to tough To die! Where the spirit of the Old West comes alive!

Tombstone Today-500WyattEarp-275Enjoy a stagecoach ride around this

historic old town!

stagecoach

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Historic Tombstone 

Wyatt Earp This image available for photographic prints and
downloads HERE!

Wyatt Earp is the best known of all the frontier lawman of the American West. Soft-spoken with nerves of steel, he survived countless gunfights due to his extraordinary patience and resolute manner. But, Earp wasn’t just the famous lawman of Dodge City and Tombstone fame; he was also a buffalo hunter, a miner, card dealer, stagecoach driver, saloon owner, and much more throughout the years.

 

 

 

Tombstone, Allen Street, 1882-500

 

Tucson Rodeo and Parade

February 18th, 2015 by Betty Ross

 Tucson Rodeo

rodeo

2015 Schedule of Events
90th ANNUAL LA FIESTA DE LOS VAQUEROS

All events are at the Tucson Rodeo Grounds, 4823 S. 6th Ave., unless otherwise noted.

(520) 741-2233 (800) 964-5662

See ticket choices and prices»
SATURDAY, FEB. 21

TUCSON RODEO OPENING DAY

Orange Day – Hunger Awareness Event by Whataburger at the Tucson Rodeo
See details below

Canon Photo Workshop – reservations required – $85 per person
11 a.m. – gates open
12:30 p.m. RAM Mutton Bustin’ and Justin Junior Rodeo
2 – 4:30 p.m. ProRodeo Competition
4:30 – 8 p.m. Coors Barn Dance

For more information on rodeo events, see Events.
SUNDAY, FEB. 22

TUCSON RODEO – SECOND PERFORMANCE

Pink Day – Cowboys & fans wear pink to support breast cancer intiatives. Chicks n Chaps breast cancer research fundraising event returns. Sponsored by Arizona Oncology. Visit our Chicks n

Chaps page now» 8 a.m. Chicks n Chaps Women’s Rodeo Clinichorse2
11 a.m. – gates open
12:30 p.m. RAM Mutton Bustin’ and Justin Junior Rodeo
2 – 4:30 p.m. ProRodeo Competition
4:30 – 8 p.m. Coors Barn Dance

Note: Full rodeo performances resume on Thursday, Feb. 26.
MONDAY AND TUESDAY, FEB. 23 AND 24

TIMED EVENTS COMPETITION (SLACK), 8 A.M.

Barrel Racing, Steer Wrestling, Tie-Down and Team Roping only. Admission: $5 general admission, children 12 and under free. Available at the gate only. Free parking.

 

Reach program for school children – 9:30 a.m. – Noonhorse3jpeg
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 25
Barrel Racing slack, 8 – 9 a.m.; Gold Card Roping at 10 a.m.

PARADE FLOAT DECORATING, 4 P.M.

Northwest area of Tucson Rodeo Grounds parking lot
THURSDAY, FEB. 26

TUCSON RODEO PARADE 9 A.M.
Over 200 non-motorized floats are on display along the one and one-half mile parade route beginning at Park Ave. and Ajo Way, proceeding south on Park to Irvington Rd. Tickets for Grandstand seating at Irvington and South 6th Ave, $10 adults, $5 kids under 13. Call (520) 294-1280 for grandstand tickets.

TUCSON RODEO, THIRD PERFORMANCE
11 a.m. – gates open
12:30 p.m. RAM Mutton Bustin’ and Justin Junior Rodeo
2 – 4:30 p.m. ProRodeo Competition
4:30 – 8 p.m. Coors Barn Dance ($5 online or at the door)rodeo1

FRIDAY, FEB. 27

TUCSON RODEO, FOURTH PERFORMANCE
11 a.m. – gates open
12:30 p.m. RAM Mutton Bustin’ and Justin Junior Rodeo
2 – 4:30 p.m. ProRodeo Competition
4:30 – 8 p.m. Coors Barn Dance ($5 online or at the door)

SATURDAY, FEB. 28

TUCSON RODEO, FIFTH PERFORMANCE
11 a.m. – gates open
12:30 p.m. RAM Mutton Bustin’ and Justin Junior Rodeo
2 – 4:30 p.m. ProRodeo Competition
4:30 – 8 p.m. Coors Barn Dance ($5 online or at the door)

SUNDAY, MARCH 1

TUCSON RODEO FINALS
11 a.m. – gates open
12:30 p.m. RAM Mutton Bustin’ and Justin Junior Rodeo
2 – 4:30 p.m. ProRodeo Competition
4:30 – 8 p.m. Coors Barn Dance ($5 online or at the door)

64396_474049272643758_627620844_nA colorful parade presented annually as part of the Tucson Rodeo and Parade (La Fiesta de los Vaqueros) since 1925. Now known as the “largest non-motorized parade in the country,” it was selected as a Top 100 Event in North America for 2015 by the American Bus Association. Longtime Tucsonan and former University of Arizona baseball coach Jerry Kindall has been chosen Grand Marshal of the 2015 Tucson Rodeo Parade.

February 26, 2015

 

Happy Valentines Day

February 13th, 2015 by Betty Ross

                                  Happy Valentines Day from Desert Dove Bed & Breakfast.

           Serving fresh Strawberries, Zucchini Quiche, Cranberry Scones with Devonshire Cream

hearts

valentines

 

hearts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mercado San Agustín & Agustín Kitchen

October 10th, 2014 by Betty Ross

Enjoy the cooling afternoon temperatures with your tourism colleagues as you wander through the grounds of the Mercado and its merchants while also visiting the Farmer’s Market. On the roof deck, sample hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar from Agustín Kitchen, and listen to the sounds of the instrumental trio Hey, Bucko!

Not familiar with the west end of downtown? Park anywhere along the 4-mile Sun Link Tucson Streetcar route, hop on the streetcar, and travel to the west end stop, right on the doorstep of the Mercado! Agustin Kitchen’s award-winning chef Ryan Clark invites you to stay for dinner after the event… show your Sun Link GoCard ticket and he will take $4 off your bill!

Mercado_San_Agustin

HeyBucko

Birding Adventures

April 9th, 2014 by Betty Ross

verdinMelody’s Birding Adventure 

So Many Birds, So Little Time

We have great birding here at Desert Dove Bed & Breakfast.  Click on Desert Dove to see just a few of our birds. All the pictures were taken on our property.

If you wish a personal birding guide, Melody is the one to call.

Take a look at her website. You can call Melody or send her an email to set up the day and time. She will pick you up here at Desert Dove and experience a wonderful birding adventure!

 

Spring in the Desert

March 24th, 2014 by Betty Ross

desertbloom

Spring in the desert is a wonderful time. What a pleasure taking in all the sights and sounds the desert has desertflowersto offer!

The Ocotillo Cactus are blooming in the Sonoran Desert. Here at Desert Dove, we have several Ocotillo blooming.  Take a drive through the Saguaro National Park to see the desert in bloom. It’s only one fourth mile from Desert Dove Bed & Breakfast
hummingbird_1

 

 

We have Penstimon blooming in our desert garden.

The bunny rabbits like to nip it down, so it will not last long.

The humming birds love the nectar!

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