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Posts Tagged ‘winter getway’

Arizona State Museum

March 5th, 2016 by Betty Ross

museumArizona State Museum | The University of Arizona
1013 E University Blvd | PO Box 210026
Tucson, AZ 85721-0026
(520) 626-8381 | 621-2976 FAX
AZ State Museum

Gallery

March 5th, 2016 by Betty Ross

Just one of the Art Gallery’s to visit during your stay at Desert Dove  in Tucson AZ

degrazia

DeGrazia Gallery in the Sun
6300 N Swan
Tucson, AZ 85718
Phone: (520) 299-9191
Toll Free: (800) 545-2185
(1909-1982)
The son of Italian immigrants, Ettore DeGrazia was born June 14, 1909, in the Morenci mining camp of Territorial Arizona. His early childhood experiences in the ethnically diverse community evolved into a lifelong appreciation of native cultures in the Sonoran Desert and a passion to create art depicting their lives and lore.
After the Phelps Dodge mine closed in 1920, DeGrazia was introduced to his parent’s hometown when they moved their seven children to the Calabria region of Italy. The family returned to Morenci when the mine reopened five years later. Enrolling again in the first grade to relearn English, DeGrazia–nicknamed Ted by a schoolteacher–graduated from Morenci High School when he was 23 years old. By then he was an accomplished trumpeter who performed with family and friends.
After working briefly in the mine, DeGrazia hitched a ride to Tucson with his trumpet and $15 in his pocket. He enrolled at the University of Arizona in 1933, where he supported himself planting trees on campus by day and leading his big band at night. During one performance he met Alexandra, the daughter of Fox Theater owner Nicholas Diamos. Ted and Alexandra wed in 1936 and moved to Bisbee so DeGrazia could manage the Lyric Theater there, also owned by the Diamos family. The couple had three children during this time but divorced in 1946.
DeGrazia and Diego Rivera
DeGrazia and Diego Rivera
DeGrazia continued creating his early paintings in Bisbee and by 1941, Raymond Carlson, editor of Arizona Highways, started publishing features about the artist. On a rare vacation to Mexico City in 1942, DeGrazia and Alexandra left an evening ballet performance and headed to the Palacio Municipal where muralist Diego Rivera was working. This encounter led to an internship with Rivera and Jose Clemente Orozco. The two Mexican masters then sponsored a solo exhibition of DeGrazia’s paintings at the prestigious Palacio de Bellas Artes.
“Los Niños”
“Los Niños”
After returning to Tucson, DeGrazia found that no gallery was interested in exhibiting his artwork, so he bought an acre of land with $25 down at Prince Road and Campbell Avenue to build his first adobe studio in 1944, and also received a BA in Education from the University of Arizona. The following year he received a BFA, plus a Master of Arts titled “Art and Its Relation to Music in Art Education”.
New York sculptor Marion Sheret met the artist when visiting his Campbell Avenue studio. As she recalled, his first words to her were “Where have you been?” They married in the jungles of Mexico in 1947 and bought the 10-acre foothills site in the early 1950s to build what was to become DeGrazia’s Gallery in the Sun.
DeGrazia’s paintings, ceramics and other artwork steadily attracted media attention including the NBC newsreel “Watch the World” and a profile in the 1953 National Geographic article “From Tucson to Tombstone.” His fame flourished when UNICEF chose his 1957 oil painting “Los Niños” for a 1960 holiday card that sold millions worldwide.
Protest at the Superstition Mountains
Protest at the Superstition Mountains
From 1960 to the mid-1970s DeGrazia became wildly successful and the gallery flourished with hundreds of thousands of yearly visitors. To protest inheritance taxes on works of art, DeGrazia hauled about 100 of his paintings on horseback into the Superstition Mountains near Phoenix and set them ablaze in 1976. This infamous event was reported in such publications as The Wall Street Journal and People magazine, becoming part of DeGrazia’s legend before his death in 1982. By this time, the artist had established the DeGrazia Foundation to ensure the permanent preservation of his art and architecture for future generations.

Wild Flowers and Birds

March 1st, 2016 by Betty Ross

verdinMelody’s Birding Adventure 

So Many Birds, So Little Time

We have great birding here at Desert Dove Bed & Breakfast.  Click on Desert Dove to see just a few of our birds. All the pictures were taken on our property.

If you wish a personal birding guide, Melody is the one to call. Take a look at her website. You can call Melody or send her an email to set up the day and time. She will pick you up here at Desert Dove and experience a wonderful birding adventure!

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Tombstone

February 24th, 2015 by Betty Ross

 

oldtucson

Tombstone

Just an hours drive from Desert Dove Bed & Breakfast and you will be in the town to tough To die! Where the spirit of the Old West comes alive!

Tombstone Today-500WyattEarp-275Enjoy a stagecoach ride around this

historic old town!

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Historic Tombstone 

Wyatt Earp This image available for photographic prints and
downloads HERE!

Wyatt Earp is the best known of all the frontier lawman of the American West. Soft-spoken with nerves of steel, he survived countless gunfights due to his extraordinary patience and resolute manner. But, Earp wasn’t just the famous lawman of Dodge City and Tombstone fame; he was also a buffalo hunter, a miner, card dealer, stagecoach driver, saloon owner, and much more throughout the years.

 

 

 

Tombstone, Allen Street, 1882-500

 

Happy Valentines Day

February 13th, 2015 by Betty Ross

                                  Happy Valentines Day from Desert Dove Bed & Breakfast.

           Serving fresh Strawberries, Zucchini Quiche, Cranberry Scones with Devonshire Cream

hearts

valentines

 

hearts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tucson Gem and Mineral Show 2015

January 19th, 2015 by Betty Ross

Gem Show    

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The Tucson Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase is one of the premier gem and mineral shows in the world. The event takes place annually in late January and February at approximately 40 to 49 different locations across the city of Tucson, Arizona. Most of the shows are open to the public, except for certain trade shows which require registration with a business license. There is not one single location for gems, minerals and fossils, but rather dealers occupy dozens of locations across the city: many big hotels and most motels are occupied for this occasion, with professionals displaying their specimens in such locations as hotel bedrooms, lobbies, tents, and lawns. The premier event of the Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase is the Tucson Gem & Mineral Show produced by the Tucson Gem and Mineral Society. This show has been held annually since 1955 and now occupies 181,000 square feet (16,800 m2) of the Tucson Convention Center. All of the shows have attendees from all across the world which includes the general public, experts, beginning collectors, museum employees, dealers, retailers, and researchers.

Fun times in Tucson!  Enjoy great weather with sunny days, and great food!

A stay at the Desert Dove Bed & Breakfast would be a good choice after a full day of shopping. Relaxing in the spa under the stars, what could be better!

 

“L a F i e s t a de los V a q u e r o s”

February 13th, 2014 by Betty Ross

rodeo rodeo1

The Parade begins at 9 am. Parade route begins on Ajo Highway 1/2 mile east of Park Ave. going east  to Park Avenue, then south on Park to Irvington Rd., west on Irvington to Sixth Avenue and north on Sixth to the North end of the Tucson Rodeo Grounds. The Judges and Reviewing stands are located on the North side of Irvington close to Sixth Ave. Grandstand seating is on Irvington Road. Seating in this area requires ticketing which can be purchased at Ticket Booths near the Grandstands or in advance at The Rodeo Parade Office.

Each year, more than 200,000 people enjoy the western-themed floats and buggies, historic horse-drawn coaches, festive Mexican folk dancers, marching bands and outfitted riders. The route begins at Park Avenue and Ajo Way, continues south to Irvington Road, then heads west on Irvington Road to South 6th Avenue.

Grandstands for viewing are located on Irvington at South 6th Avenue. See tickets for information for Grandstand tickets.  Viewing along both sides of the route, which stretches just over a mile, is available at no charge.

Visitors to Tucson can explore the Tucson Rodeo Parade Museum. Located on the northeast corner of S. Sixth Ave. and Irvington Road, the large building was originally the first city airport hanger, established in 1918. It was dedicated November 20, 1919 and was referred to as the Mayse Airport.

There are over one hundred buggies and wagons on display as well as a continually growing collection of Old West artifacts. There is a typical western street with various shops, and historical memorabilia of Tucson.

For more information on the Tucson Rodeo Parade and Museum, contact the Tucson Rodeo Parade
at (520) 294-1280 Plan to arrive early as Grandstand entertainment begins at 8:00 A.M. on Parade day.

Enjoy a stay at Desert Dove Bed &Breakfast!  Lots of fun in Tucson, AZ

Tucson Gem Show

January 29th, 2014 by Betty Ross

gems The World’s Largest Treasure Hunt
February 1 – 16, 2014
The popular Gem Show Hotline, 622-GEMS(4367), will REOPEN on January 17, 2014!  In the meantime, please call our Visitor Information number at 800-638-8350. TucsonGems.

For two weeks every winter, the world meets in Tucson as it becomes a bustling, international marketplace of buyers and sellers at the Tucson Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase.

The “Gem Show” is much more than a single event at one location. Rather, there are thousands of participants and attendees at more than 40 sites around town. Dozens of shows take place at the same time – in giant white tents, at hotels and resorts and at exhibit halls.

There’s something for everyone at the many open-to-the-public shows – from gold and diamonds to granite bookends and glass beads, and from fine specimens of dinosaur fossils to opals dug from the Australian Outback.

The Desert Dove Bed and Breakfast   a great place to stay while taking in the Gem and Mineral Show. You can start your day with a cup early morning cup of coffee or your favorite tea watching the birds. Enjoy a wonderful breakfast. At the end of your long day of shopping you can relax in our hydrotherapy spa with a glass of wine and take in some stargazing!

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Old Town Artisans

March 11th, 2013 by Betty Ross

Old Town

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Event Name: Music and dinner under the stars
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Days: Wednesdays thru Saturdays

Times: 7:00PM – 9:00PM –

Location: La Cocina courtyard stage in the Old Town Artisans complex  201 N. Court Ave.

Cost: Admission Free

Event Descriptions:

Collin Shook Trio

Wed 3/13/13 – 6:30 PM The hard-driving sound of the Collin Shook Trio is a departure from the Tucson jazz scene. His playing is a fusion between the Hard-Bop of the 60’s and the modern composition of today, mixed with his classical roots.
The hard-driving sound of the Collin Shook Trio is a departure from the Tucson jazz scene.

fusion between the Hard-Bop of the 60’s and the modern composition of today, mixed with his classical roots.

Stefan George

Thu 3/14/13 – 6:30 PM
One of Tucson’s best-loved singer/songwriters, Stefan George has won award after award for his evocative songwriting and luminous guitar playing. He was a New Folk Award Finalist at the Kerrville (Texas) Folk Festival in 1996, a Telluride Bluegrass Festival Troubadour Finalist in 1996, and a Tucson Area Music (TAMMY) award winner in 1994, 1995 and 1997 — with 1997 awards in Best Songwriter, Best Solo Acoustic Performer and Best Acoustic Ensemble categories. In addition, this versatile musician hosted the “Blues Summit” at the 1997 Kerrville Folk Festival and has been invited back to Kerrville ever since. Stefan was a featured Showcase artist at South By Southwest in 1991 and 1994. He has also performed in concert with David Wilcox, Norman Blake, Bill Miller, Rory Block and Bill Morrissey, to name but a few

The Greg Morton Band

Fri 3/15/13 – 6:30 PM
The Greg Morton Band is local to southern Arizona.Greg Morton was born in Memphis, Tennessee. He began to play the guitar when he was around 12 years of age.After sharpening his skills playing traditional bluegrass music, Greg began to apply his talents to other musical styles, including country and jazz. Greg’s travels eventually brought him to Tucson, Arizona. Far from the hills of Tennessee, Greg found that the ‘high lonesome’ sounds of bluegrass music were already reverberating through the canyons of the Sonoran Desert in southern Arizona. Today, Greg plays in various venues throughout southern Arizona.

Miss Lana Rebel w/Kevin Michael Mayfield

Sat 3/16/13 – 12:00 PM
The Portland Mercury wrote that Miss Lana Rebel is “the badass matriarch of local dustbowl country.” It’s an appreciative nod to a songwriter whose presence can cut through the din of a crowded honky-tonk, and a voice that has been likened to ladies such as Loretta Lynn, and June Carter. She is widely known as an excellent country musician and songwriter, though her musical history is not quite so straightforward.

The Wayback Machine

Sat 3/16/13 – 7:00 PM
“A beloved Tucson institution.”

For more information call: La Cocina Restaurant
( 520 ) 622-0351
or check the La Cocima Calendat at:
lacocinatucson.com/

Tucson Rodeo Parade

February 20th, 2013 by Betty Ross

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Mark your calendars for the 88th Annual Rodeo Parade, February 21 – Since 1925, the ‘Old Pueblo’ has celebrated the Tucson Rodeo – La Fiesta de los Vaqueros with what has become the longest, non-motorized parade in the country. Read more about the history of this beloved Tucson tradition Tucson Rodeo Parade

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